HP Announces New Chromebook 14, G4 Version Allows Virtual Desktop And App Access

HP already has two Chromebooks on the market -- an 11-inch model powered by the Intel Celeron N2840 (2.16 GHz, up to 2.58 GHz) and a 14-inch model with Nvidia's Tegra K1 processor (2.3 GHz max clock speed) -- and now it wants to make even more with the announcement of two additional devices.

Just like the HP Chromebook 11, the HP Chromebook 14 uses the Intel Celeron N2840 chip. Those who purchase the new device also gain access to 100 GB of Google Drive storage for two years, 12 free Gogo in-air passes to keep customers connected during flights, three free Google Play movie rentals, and 90 days of free Google Play music.

Chromebook 14


CPU

Intel Celeron N2840 (2.16 GHz, up to 2.58 GHz)

RAM

2 GB DDR3L SDRAM

Display

14-inch HD (1366 x 768)

Storage

16 GB eMMC

GPU

Intel HD Graphics

I/O

1x USB 3.0, 2x USB 2.0, 1x HDMI, 1x microSD card reader

The other, current Nvidia-powered 14-inch HP Chromebook costs $439.99, but it's on sale right now for $409.99. The new HP Chromebook 14 will be significantly less expensive at $249.99 when it comes out on November 8. There's also an option to get a model with a full HD IPS display, but you'll have to pay $279.99 with the upgrade.

The second model is called the HP Chromebook 14 G4, and it's geared towards schools and small to medium businesses. It seems that on the hardware side, the only difference is the increase in internal storage to 32 GB eMMC, but it also includes multiple security layers, enhanced virtualization and console-based management, and VPN connections for the office or classroom.

In fact, HP said that it's the first Chromebook verified for Citrix Receiver 1.8 for Chrome. This allows the user to get into virtual desktops on Windows and Linux, and hosted apps on the Windows Server. It can even remotely access other Chromebooks with the help of remote desktop apps.

While the general consumer waits until November, business and schools can get the Chromebook 14 G4 sometime this October for $279.

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Rexly Peñaflorida II is a Contributor at Tom’s Hardware. He writes news on tech and hardware, but mostly focuses on gaming news. As a Chicagoan, he believes that deep dish pizza is real pizza and ketchup should never be on hot dogs. Ever. Also, Portillo’s is amazing.

Follow Rexly Peñaflorida II @Heirdeux. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

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  • zanny
    I'd say its funny to be releasing a 768p 14" notebook in 2015, but its not. Its just sad. And this isn't even Windows with program scaling breaking like bad gas on anything with a higher pixel density than something from the Atari age.

    There are way too many competitive 1080p Chromebooks in the $200-300 price range today that anyone should even consider this thing.
  • kawininjazx
    You can buy a toshiba chromebook 1 used for $100 and it's the same thing as this.
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    Quote:
    14-inch HD (1366 x 768)


    Can we get some more info, Tom's? This isn't The Verge or some other "tech for dummies" site (at least I hope it still isn't), you guys gotta at least let us know the panel type and whether it's glossy or matte.

    Anyhow, HP can't even get their business laptops right, not speaking about consumer ones... and this Chromebook stuff... just give up. Asus has their new Transformer T100HA selling for $300 and it's got full Windows 8.1 onboard with better specs and a nice 400 nit IPS HD panel. Go beat that.

    Quote:
    Those who purchase the new device also gain access to 100 GB of Google Drive storage for two years, 12 free Gogo in-air passes to keep customers connected during flights, three free Google Play movie rentals, and 90 days of free Google Play music.


    I wish one could opt to buy the thing without all these offers but at like $50-100 less. Then it'd be actually competitive. But of course they can't do that, because Chromebooks, just like Amazon's Fire lineup, are there to get people hooked to subscription services, not provide real value for money.

    Quote:
    You can buy a toshiba chromebook 1 used for $100 and it's the same thing as this.


    Have you ever seen a used Chromebook? I have. These devices don't exactly age well. Especially the cheap models. Doubt someone would want to pay even $100 for a second-hand one.

    Quote:
    There are way too many competitive 1080p Chromebooks in the $200-300 price range today that anyone should even consider this thing.


    Resolution isn't everything. While I love high-resolution screens, I admit that I'd rather work on a 768p IPS panel with decent colors and contrast than a piss-poor 1080p TN. Bonus points if the lower-res screen is matte.