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Best RP2040 Boards 2022

Best RP2040 Boards
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

While Raspberry Pi boards have been around since 2012, they have been powered by Broadcom SoCs. But in January 2021 we saw the first Raspberry Pi silicon, the RP2040 arrive and in a short space of time it has become a major SoC in the maker community. With two Arm Cortex M0+ cores running at 133 MHz, 264KB of RAM and up to 16MB of Flash, these chips open up a new range of microcontrollers that compete more closely with traditional Arduino boards than a Raspberry Pi 4.

While Raspberry Pi has its own RP2040-powered board in the Raspberry Pi Pico, there are now more than sixty, third-party solutions that offer improvements which range from smaller sizes to built-in Wi-Fi, more storage or a lot of additional outputs. There are even RP2040-powered keypads and RP2040 breakouts designed to be embedded into your next project. All of these boards share the same $1 RP2040 chip, but offer much more than the stock model.

To help you choose, we’ve listed the best RP2040 boards below. These boards can be used for everything from general learning to building Wi-Fi connected robots to implementing basic A.I. 

Shopping Tips for RP2040 Boards 

  • What size / pins do you need?  Smaller RP2040 boards like Pimoroni's Tiny RP2040, SparkFun's Pro Micro RP2040 and Adafruit's QT Py RP2040 have fewer than the standard 40 pins, but can fit in smaller projects.
  • Do you need wireless? Right now there are only a few boards, for example Arduino's Nano RP2040 Connect, which comes with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth built-in, but you can add these using add-ons such as Adafruit’s Airlift board or Pimoroni’s Pico Wireless Pack.
  • Choose your ecosystem: The pinouts of different RP2040 boards may align with different add-ons. For example, Adafruit’s Feather RP2040 is compatible with around two dozen different FeatherWing, including those which offer wireless connectivity while the Pico itself connects directly to Pimroni’s “packs."
  • Specialist connectors such as Stemma QT, Qwiic and Grove are desirable extra features for those that want simple and neat electronics projects. The Pico doesn’t come with any of these, but many third-party boards do. The simplicity of these connections belies the choice of sensors and components offered.

Best Raspberry Pi RP2040 Boards You Can Buy Today 

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
$6 Dual core Arm microcontroller

Reasons to buy

+
Solid hardware
+
Backwards compatibility
+
Wi-Fi connects effortlessly

Reasons to avoid

-
No Bluetooth
-
Micro USB

The original and least expensive RP2040 board, the Raspberry Pi PIco costs just $4, and while it provided a solid base for projects it lacked Wi-Fi. The $6 Raspberry Pi Pico W introduced Wi-Fi to the Pico, while retaining the exact same pinout as its predecessor. This smart move means that the plethora of RP2040 accessories are available to the Pico W.

Getting online with the Raspberry Pi Pico W is a breeze. Just five lines of MicroPython is all it takes to connect, and from there we have a multitude of options at our disposal. We now have a $6 data collection device, a web controlled robot, or Internet connected information gathering platform.

The Raspberry Pi Pico W adds to the Pico ecosystem. It provides us with a lower power option to the Raspberry Pi Zero W 2 and keeps the Raspberry Pi product range ticking while the global supply chain recovers.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico W Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
The Gold Standard of ‘Pi Silicon’

Reasons to buy

+
Great form factor
+
STEMMA QT easy to use
+
FeatherWing add-ons
+
Onboard battery connection and charging
+
Pin labelling on both sides of the board

Reasons to avoid

-
No pull up resistors on I2C pins
-
No battery monitoring

Adafruit, partners in the RP2040 project have released many great RP2040 boards in a short space of time. The company has its own ecosystem of form factors and its largest, the Feather, is where we saw their first RP2040 system. Designed to take advantage of an expansive range of add-ons called “FeatherWings”, the Feather RP2040 has fewer pins than a typical Raspberry Pi Pico, but the choice of pins is curated to give us the best that the RP2040 can offer.

What we lose in GPIO pins we gain in onboard LiPo / Li-Ion battery charging, great pin labeling and Stemma QT, Adafruit’s connector of choice for components that connect using I2C. With Stemma QT we have none of the messy wiring and polarity issues, enabling us to focus on the project and not our wiring.

If you’re looking for the most versatile RP2040 board on the market, look no further. Sure, we pay a premium over the Raspberry Pi Pico, but the Adafruit Feather RP2040 is a refined product that is ready to drop into your next project.

Read: Adafruit Feather RP2040 Review


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
The ideal way to build your Raspberry Pi Pico projects

Reasons to buy

+
Low cost
+
Easy to use
+
Lots of extra features
+
Inline LEDs
+
Grove connectors

Reasons to avoid

-
ESP-01 needs extra work 

The Raspberry Pi Pico is a fun and inexpensive way to get into coding and electronics. After buying a Pico, we need to also buy extra components to expand its scope and this can become costly and complicated. The Maker Pi Pico crams a lot of extra functions into a small package all for less than $10, including a pre-soldered Raspberry Pi Pico.

For $10, the sheer amount of features is amazing. We have a micro SD card reader, buzzer / 3.6mm audio jack, NeoPixel, all of the GPIO pins broken out for use and we have six Grove connectors for use with compatible components. Each of the GPIO pins has a useful LED that can be used to quickly debug an issue. The included ESP-01 header enables basic Wi-Fi access and, since we wrote our review, Cytron has released an updated guide on how to get the Maker Pi Pico connected to wireless. For $10 this board is hard to beat!

Read: Cytron Maker Pi Pico Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
A tiny board for great projects

Reasons to buy

+
Small size
+
Stemma QT Port
+
USB-C

Reasons to avoid

-
Lack of GPIO pins 

Adafruit’s QT Py RP2040 is similar to Pimoroni’s Tiny 2040. We have the RP2040 squeezed into the smallest package and we have a curated selection of GPIO pins for our projects. Adafruit’s QTPy RP2040 has castellated edges, designed to surface mount the board into a project and it features a Stemma QT / Qwiic connector which breaks out an additional I2C connection for use with Stemma QT / Qwiic compatible components, a useful and tidy solution for rapid prototyping.

The low cost and ease of use afforded by the QTPy RP2040 is amplified by Adafruit’s MicroPython fork, CircuitPython, which has many libraries of code for use with Stemma QT / Qwiic components. Even if you already own a Raspberry Pi Pico, the QTPy RP2040 should still be part of your project box.

Read: Adafruit QT Py RP2040 Review  


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. RP2040 Stamp

Distilling the Raspberry Pi Pico experience into a one inch square board

Reasons to buy

+
Small form factor
+
GPIO selection is excellent
+
PCB Design footprints
+
Ease of use

Reasons to avoid

-
2mm pin pitch 

Solder Party’s RP2040 Stamp is a $12, one-inch square board resembles a postage stamp but emblazoned on the center is the familiar RP2040 SoC, along with 8MB of flash storage and a full complement of GPIO pins forming a perimeter of castellations around the board.

RP2040 Stamp is designed for use in your own PCBs. The castellations and onboard LiPo charging system means that most of the hard work is done for us. This is a smartly designed board which we can see being used in a plethora of new projects. 

Read: Solder Party RP2040 Stamp Review 

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Pico Pinout with Plenty of Extras

Reasons to buy

+
Identical Pico pinout
+
Battery charging
+
Stemma QT / Qwiic connector
+
Large flash memory
+
USB C

Reasons to avoid

-
Costs much more than a Pico 

Many of the Raspberry Pi Pico alternatives have one thing in common, they lack the full set of GPIO pins found on the Pico. Pimoroni’s Pico LiPo is a drop-in replacement for the Raspberry Pi Pico that provides all of the GPIO pins found on a Pico, with added bonus of onboard LiPo / Li-Ion charging and a Stemma QT / Qwiic connector. 

Pico LiPo does cost more than three times the price of a standard Pico, but with these extra features in the same form factor we can justify spending the extra money. If you are planning to build embedded / mobile projects or wish to try out the Stemma QT / Qwiic components ecosystem, then Pico LiPo is a serious contender for your attention.

Read: Pimoroni Pico LiPo Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
The Spark of Invention

Reasons to buy

+
Lots of features
+
Compact form factor
+
Simple MicroPython module
+
Compatible with other MicroPython firmware

Reasons to avoid

-
Bespoke motor connections
-
Lack of GPIO pins

For the Raspberry Pi, the Explorer HAT series of boards were the first step for many roboteers. Mixing easy to use software with great hardware was a winning combination. For the Raspberry Pi Pico W we see Inventor 2040 W following this fine tradition. When we say it just works, we really do mean it.

In our review we loved the simplicity of the board. It afforded us the confidence to invent and create ideas. From motorized contraptions, servos, sensors, a rather cute light show and a sea shanty. You can do it all with this board.

At the heart of the board is the Raspberry Pi Pico W and this brings Wi-Fi to the mix. This board has all the features you could need, and it can replace the Raspberry Pi Zero for many maker projects. In the classroom, makerspace or the home, this board is the one to reach for.

Read: Pimoroni Inventor 2040 W Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Cheaper than a Big Mac meal and much more nourishing

Reasons to buy

+
Small form factor
+
USB C
+
Castellated Edges
+
Low cost

Reasons to avoid

-
Documentation needs a little work
-
Onboard NeoPixel doesn’t work with CircuitPython

Seeed’s $5 XIAO RP2040 is an upgrade on its previous SAMD21 model for no extra money. It shares the same pinout as Adafruit’s QT Py RP2040 but lacks the Stemma QT port. If you really need that port then pay the extra $5 for the QT Py, but for most uses Seeed’s XIAO RP2040 is more than up to the job.

The tiny board is made for dropping into an embedded project, and the castellated edges mean we can easily surface mount solder this board to a PCB. The cost per board means that we can embed and forget a project without hurting our wallets. 

Read: Seeed XIAO RP2040 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Wearable

Reasons to buy

+
Great size
+
Connectivity
+
Clear screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Reasons to
-
Avoid No reset button
-
CircuitPython support

A bright and clear 2.4 inch IPS LCD that you can wear around your neck, or keep on your desk. Powered by the RP2040, Tufty 2040 is all about the display. Front and center this is a great display with good viewing angles and rich colors. Designed to be worn as a conference badge, Tufty 2040 is much more than a vanity project.

Around the back we see connections for Qw/ST (StemmaQT / Qwiic) sensors, which means we can easily use Tufty 2040 as a desktop data station for air quality and temperature data. Power can come from one of three sources. USB C, AAA batteries or LiPo. The AAA batteries and LiPo options connect via a dedicated JST-PH connector, but note that there is no builtin charging circuit so your batteries will need to be charged externally.

The small size, easy to use MicroPython library and Qw/ST connector elevate Tufty 2040 from being “just a badge” into a great data visualization tool. Sure we would love to see Wi-Fi as an option, Tufty 2040 came out just before the Raspberry Pi Pico W, so the overlap is unfortunate. That said, Tufty 2040 is still a great purchase.

Read: Pimoroni Tufty 2040 Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Programmable Keyboard with Pi Silicon Inside

Reasons to buy

+
Ease of use
+
Compact size
+
Clicky Keys

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey
-
Lacks MicroPython support

Pimoroni’s Keybow 2040 is something special in the RP2040 range: a programmable 16-key keypad, powered by the RP2040. This isn’t a board that you use to build a project, rather it is something that we integrate into a project. With 16 mechanical keys, each with an addressable NeoPixel LED we can build the Keybow 2040 into our daily workflow.

The board ships with Pimoroni’s fork of MicroPython with modules to use Keybow 2040, but you will only get the best from this board via Adafruit’s CircuitPython and its USB HID module. Using this we can assign keypresses, media keys and mouse movements to any of the keys, making short work of tedious tasks.

Read: Pimoroni Keybow 2040 Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
All the features you need without wasting a millimeter

Reasons to buy

+
Qwiic connector
+
Great choice of GPIO
+
Small size
+
Castellated edges

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one I2C channel 

The $10 SparkFun Pro Micro RP2040 is the cheapest model in SparkFun’s range and follows a classic design that resembles an Arduino Nano board layout which is at home in a breadboard and embedded into your projects. We have fewer GPIO pins than a Pico, but more than Adafruit’s QTPy RP2040 while retaining a small layout.

SparkFun’s Qwiic connector, compatible with Adafruit’s Stemma QT, enables us to use many of the compatible components such as sensors and displays with the Pro Micro and for $10 this is a Swiss Army Knife of a board that provides a cost effective and multi-purpose means to explore the RP2040 ecosystem.

Read: SparkFun Pro Micro RP2040 Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Simple Citizen Science

Reasons to buy

+
Setup wizard is smooth
+
Software is easy to use
+
Small size
+
Ease of use

Reasons to avoid

-
Only QW/ST breakout, no GPIO  

The Raspberry Pi Pico W unleashed a low-cost, easy to use entrypoint for education and citizen science projects. For just $6 we now have a Wi-Fi connected device that can stream data over a network. Pimoroni’s Enviro Indoor uses the Pico W as the brains of an Internet of Things appliance that comes with its own temperature, humidity, air pressure, light and air quality sensors, packaged in a small board. The included setup script elevates Enviro Indoor from being “just another” sensor, into an accessible appliance designed to get results with minimal effort.

Read: Pimoroni Enviro Indoor


Les Pounder is an associate editor at Tom's Hardware. He is a creative technologist and for seven years has created projects to educate and inspire minds both young and old. He has worked with the Raspberry Pi Foundation to write and deliver their teacher training program "Picademy".

  • chabala
    Why no WIZnet W5100S-EVB-Pico? $10 with a built in hardwired ethernet jack.
    Reply
  • Leptir
    Adafruit is a gold standard??!! Clearly the author never had to deal with their customer support because if he did, he'd know that Adafruit is the nastiest, most pathetic company that has ever existed. If you don't trust me, read reviews on Google or Yelp to see how they deal with anybody who has any sort of problem with their products.
    Reply