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PSU Roundup: Performance, Price, Efficiency

First Up: Cooler Master Silent Pro 500 Watt

The Silent Pro series from Cooler Master consists of three models ranging from 500 watts to 700 watts. For our test, Cooler Master sent its 500 watt offering.

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Unlike competing PSUs, the Silent Pro power supplies includes its own form of cable management—you’ll immediately notice the flat black cables, which are much easier to tuck out of the way than the thinner, rounded bundles typical of high-end PSUs.

At first glance, the cables appear unexciting, but they offer tremendous advantages: to begin, the cords are extremely flexible and allow you to connect devices without putting tension on the cords, which would then also put pressure on the ports. This innovation eliminates the common concern about SATA power connectors when attaching hard drives using power supplies with stiff cords.

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  • falchard
    That coolermaster PSU is nice that its cables are thin since its really annoying to have those stiff cables fill a small case. However, I wonder about its interference. That insulation and mesh is there for a reason, to prevent discharge and electrical interference of other parts.

    Also I can see the reason why a person wouldn't want a CPU/ATX connector on a 700w power supply. If they had an excessively power draining system like a Quad/Tri GPU with modern high end cards it will waste alot of power and using 2 lower watt power supplies is cheaper then getting 1 high watt one.
    Reply
  • dirtmountain
    Nice fluff piece. I sure wouldn't use any of these recommendations over jonnygurus or hardwaresecrets sites though.
    Reply
  • optik
    Just bought myself Zalman's ZM-750HP with cable management and heatpipe cooling.. Cost only 131 euros.. When I saw the article's header I hoped to see it being reviewed, but no such luck. Would've been nice to see how the Zalman's offerings would've fared against others.. The productline ranges from 360Watts to full 1000Watt PSU's so plenty to choose from..
    Reply
  • Proximon
    Without voltage ripple and heat tests you can't properly evaluate a power supply. At least readers can use this as a starting point for further research.
    Reply
  • http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/410
    Reply
  • dirtmountain
    +1 to doctorpink
    Reply
  • chookman
    Heat is generally relative to efficiency , due the fact that the more energy lost the more heat generated.

    Ill agree with the ripple tests too, yeh great we might have a power supply that is efficient at 100% but what if the 12v rails are hovering outside of spec...? Its a nothing review really.
    Reply
  • Please add the "S" onto the word VOLT
    Thanks
    Reply
  • jt1
    falchardThat coolermaster PSU is nice that its cables are thin since its really annoying to have those stiff cables fill a small case. However, I wonder about its interference. That insulation and mesh is there for a reason, to prevent discharge and electrical interference of other parts.
    What manufacturers use insulation and mesh that block interference? The insulation on the wires of my PSUs is standard insulation, the mesh is plastic and there strictly to hold the wires in place and prevent the inside of a computer case from becoming a birds nest of wires.

    If there are manufacturers that use materials to block interferences, I'd like like to look into their products as it sounds interesting but I'd like to hear from someone actually in the know as to if it would make any difference or not.
    Reply
  • pcfxer
    Interference on a power supply is negligible. The power runs, voltages and current are of little concern for interference. IF you want to be truly theoretical it would make a "difference".

    When I studied power engineering one would need a ton of voltage or current to be 'eligible' for most electrical phenomena to occur - theoretically.
    Reply