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Best Ultrabooks and Premium Laptops 2020

HP Spectre x360 13 2019 (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Whether you’re a student, a professional or just want to stay connected and productive, a laptop is one of the most important tools of the trade. But some are better than others, with wide differences in keyboards, battery life, displays and design. If you’re looking for a powerful laptop that easily fits in your bag and doesn’t break your back, you want an ultrabook.

The “ultrabook” moniker was originally coined by Intel in 2012 and used to refer to a set of premium, super-thin laptops that met the chipmaker’s predefined standards. However, just as many folks refer to tissues as Kleenexes or web searching as Googling, the term ultrabook commonly refers to any premium ultraportable laptop, whether it carries Intel’s seal of approval or not. 

There are more premium laptop choices today than ever before, with options ranging in size and form factor from 10-inch 2-in-1s to 17-inch workstations. To help you choose, we review scores of laptops every year, evaluating not only their performance but also their usability and value. We list all of the best gaming laptops elsewhere on our site, but below you’ll find our favorite ultrabooks and premium laptops.

Quick Ultrabook / Premium Laptop Shopping Tips 

  • Get a good keyboard: Whether you’re using an ultrabook to browse the web, send emails, code, write or do other productivity work, the keyboard is one of your primary ways of interacting. Get something with responsive keys that aren’t mushy. Low-travel is ok if the keys have the right feel to them, but the last thing you want to do is “bottom out” while typing.  
  • Consider what you need in a screen: At a minimum, your laptop should have a 1920 x 1080 screen. Some laptops offer 4K options, though it’s sometimes harder to see the difference at 13-inches or below. While 4K may be more detailed, 1080p screens give you much longer battery life. 
  • Some laptops can be upgraded: While CPUs and GPUs are almost always soldered down, some laptops let you replace the RAM and storage, so you can buy cheaper now and add more memory and a bigger hard drive or SSD down the road. But the thinnest laptops may not have that option. 
  • Battery life is important: Aim for something that lasts for 8 hours or longer on a charge (gaming is an exception). For productivity, many laptops easily surpass this number. But be wary of manufacturer claims, which don’t always use strenuous tests. Some laptops are starting to add fast charging, which is a nice bonus. 

Best Ultrabooks and Premium Laptops 2020 

HP Spectre x360 (13-inch) (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

1. HP Spectre x360 (13-inch)

Best Ultrabook Overall

CPU: Intel Core i7-1065G7 | GPU: Intel Iris Plus (integrated) | Display: 13.3-inch, 1920 x 1080, touchscreen | Weight: 2.7 pounds / 1.2 kg

Great battery life
Snappy keyboard
Winning design
Has USB Type-A and Type-C ports
Speakers could be louder for this price
Competitors have brighter screens

While there are thinner ultrabooks out there, it’s easy to recommend the HP Spectre x360 as the top laptop. Our review configuration , with its Intel Core i7-1065G7 and a 1920 x 1080 touch screen is powerful enough for most people. If you want stronger productivity performance, you may want to consider an ultrabook with one of Intel’s Comet Lake CPUs rather than this Ice Lake option.

One of the Spectre’s biggest draws is its selection of ports, a feature you don’t see on all of the best ultrabooks. For what is still a thin machine, you get two Thunderbolt 3 ports (over USB Type-C), USB Type-A 3.1 Gen 1, a micro SD card reader and a headphone jack. Several laptop manufacturers have given up on Type-A to chase thinness, but the USB Type-A port on the Spectre has a drop-jaw design to make it fit.

The ultrabook also has a snappy keyboard and strong battery life. It lasted 13 hours and 19 seconds on our test, so it should easily last you all day. 

Read: HP Spectre x360 (13-inch) review  

Dell XPS 13 (9300) (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

2. Dell XPS 13 (9300)

Best Ultrabook Clamshell

CPU: Intel Core i7-1065G7 | GPU: Intel Iris Plus (integrated) | Display: 13.3-inch, 1920 x 1080, touchscreen | Weight: 2.8 pounds / 1.2 kg

Long battery life
Excellent keyboard
16:10 display gives more vertical screen space
Tiny bottom bezel
No USB Type-A ports
Tinny audio

Long considered one of the best ultrabooks around, the Dell XPS 13 is easily recommendable, especially if you want something that’s very thin and light. 

If you want stronger performance, an alternate model with a Comet Lake processor may be for you. But this design, which we reviewed with an Intel Core i7-1065G7 “Ice Lake” processor is far more sleek. 

The move to a 16:10 display gives more vertical space on the screen, which is great for productivity. Instead of a 1920 x 1080 display on the XPS 13’s base panel, you get 1920 x 1200, which goes up to 3840 x 2400 (rather than 3840 x 2160) on the 4K screen.

The XPS 13 also fared extremely well on our battery test, lasting over 13 hours on a model with a 1920 x 1200 display. The 4K display lasted a respectable 8 hours and 14 minutes on a charge.

Read: Dell XPS 13 (9300) review 

Apple MacBook Pro (16-inch) (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

3. MacBook Pro (16-inch)

The Best Mac

CPU: Intel Core i9-9980HK | GPU: AMD Radeon Pro 5500M | Display: 16-inch, 3072 x 1920, True Tone | Weight: 4.3 pounds / 2 kg

Magic Keyboard is great
Best audio we've heard from a laptop
Long battery life
Strong performance
Pros need more ports and SD card slot
32-bit apps and games don't work in macOS Catalina

The Mac option on our list is the most powerful premium laptop Apple has ever made: the 16-inch MacBook Pro. It has Apple’s latest “Magic Keyboard,” (the nice one), and has a discrete AMD Radeon Pro 5500M for graphics work.

It offers long battery life, and if you care about audio, we’ve never heard better sound from a laptop than on this one.

The 16-inch screen fits in a 15-inch chassis, so you’re not losing any portability by going with the bigger size.

But it’s not cheap, so if you need to spend less, consider the 13-inch model. We reviewed the 13-inch MacBook Pro with 10th Gen Intel processors and the Magic Keyboard and found it to be a solid refresh without the discrete graphics.

For those interested in the upcoming Apple Silicon, the company's custom designs based on Arm, you won't have to wait long. Apple said the first devices with those chips will be released later this year, as well as more computers with Intel processors.

Read: MacBook Pro (16-inch) review 

Asus ROG Zephyrus G14 (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

4. Asus ROG Zephyrus G14

The Best Overall Gaming Laptop

CPU: AMD Ryzen 4900HS | GPU: Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 Max-Q | Display: 14-inch, 1920 x 1080 120Hz | Weight: 3.5 pounds (1.6 kg)

Good looks
AMD Ryzen 4900HA offers strong performance
Stellar battery life
Comfortable keyboard
Fan sometime whirs when idle
No webcam
No Thunderbolt 3

For those looking for something slim and attractive, our pick is the Asus ROG Zephyrus G14. As far as gaming laptops go, the Zephyrus is unassuming in either white or gray with minimalist stylings. But with the AMD Ryzen 4900HS and Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 Max-Q in our review unit, you get strong productivity and gaming performance. It’s not the best performer on the market in terms of graphics, but it’s the best value for most people. 

The battery life is also surprisingly long for a gaming notebook and the keyboard is clicky and comfortable. The fan, however, sometimes goes off even when just sitting on the desktop, and this system doesn’t come equipped with a built-in webcam.

Read: Asus ROG Zephyrus G14 review 

HP Elite Dragonfly (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. HP Elite Dragonfly

The Best Ultrabook for Work

CPU: Intel Core i7-8665U | GPU: Intel UHD 620 (integrated) | Display: 13.3-inch, 1920 x 1080 touchscreen | Weight: 2.5 pounds / 1.1 kg

Attractive, solid, lightweight design
Excellent battery life
Pleasingly tactile keyboard
Thunderbolt 3, plus full-sized USB Type-A and HDMI
CPU options stuck at 8th Gen
Function row keys are tiny

The HP Dragonfly Elite is a work ultrabook that you can envy. It feels just as good as premium consumer-grade machines, unlike some business laptops that feel clunky and outdated. Beyond the style, it also boasts long battery life.

The keyboard is tactile and clicky, and there’s a great selection of ports. The ultrabook has both Thunderbolt 3 and full-sized USB Type-A for peripherals old and new.

As of our review, CPU options were stuck at 8th Gen, as no newer business-focused chips with vPro were yet announced.

Read: HP Dragonfly Elite review 

Asus ZenBook Duo UX481 (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

6. Asus ZenBook Duo UX481

Best Dual Screen Laptop

CPU: Intel Core i7-10510U | GPU: Nvidia GeForce MX250 | Display: 14 inch 1080p (1920 x1080) touchscreen, 12.6 inch (1920 x 515) ScreenPad Plus | Weight: 3.3 pounds / 1.5 kg

Reasonably thin and light for a dual-screen laptop
Intuitive control software for managing the second screen
Very good battery life for a dual-screen laptop
Second screen mean small keys and a tiny touchpad
Mostly middling performance

The dual screen laptop market is still very young, but the Asus ZenBook Duo is the most promising out of the gate. While it isn’t as powerful as the Pro version, the Duo is rather light and thin for a laptop with two screens, and we got 9 hours and 44 minutes of battery life out of it.

While Windows 10 doesn’t natively support dual screen applications just yet, Asus’ ScreenPad Plus launcher is intuitive, letting you drag apps to the secondary display or even launch them there with a touch. 

There are some compromises, particularly in the size and placement of the keyboard and touchpad. But if you want two screens for productivity on a laptop, this is your best option right now.

Read:  Asus ZenBook Duo UX481 review 

CPUGPURAMStorageDisplay
HP Spectre x360 (13-inch)Up to Intel Core i7-1065G7Intel Iris Plus GraphicsUp to 16GB LPDDR4Up to 2TB PCie NVMe SSD13.3inches, up to 4K
Dell XPS 13 (9300)Up to Intel Core i7-1065G7Intel Iris Plus GraphicsUp to 32GB LPDDR4XUp to 2TB PCie NVMe SSD13.4-inches, up to 3840 x 2400 
MacBook Pro (16-inch)Up to Intel Core i9-9980HKUp to AMD Radeon Pro 5500MUp to 64GB DDR4Up to 8TB SSD16 inches, 3072 x 1920
Asus ROG Zephyrus G14AMD Ryzen 4900HSNvidia GeForce RTX 2060 with ROG Boost16GB DDR4-3200 (8GB on-board, 8GB SODIMM)1TB PCIe 3.0 M.2 NVMe14 inches, 1920 x 1080, 120 Hz
HP Elite DragonflyUp to Intel Core i7-8665UIntel UHD Graphics 620Up to 16GB LPDDR3Up to 256GB PCIe NVMe SSD13.3 inches, 1920 x 1080, optional SureView privacy 
Asus ZenBook Duo UX481Intel Core i7-10510UNvidia GeForce MX25016GB DDR31TB PCIe NVMe SSD 14 inch 1080p (1920 x1080) touchscreen, 12.6 inch (1920 x 515) ScreenPad Plus
  • mitch074
    ...and not a single Renoir based machine.
    Reply
  • brakteat
    Indeed. Four years ago when I bought my current laptop, I would not consider buying one with a CPU from AMD because Intel had so much better performance per watt. Now the opposite is true.

    This article actually highlights a true embarrassment for Dell, HP and Apple. They have known since long that AMD would offer Zen2-based mobile CPU with an expected much superior performance compared to Intel. Still all three missed the train by launching new high-end models with only Intel CPU.
    Reply
  • mariusmotea
    I avoid HP and HPE hardware as much as possible after very bad experience with lot of them. Only the laser printers and the L3 switches are quality products.
    Reply
  • jpeters44
    Seriously? How can you keep a straight face while recommending the N-th rehashing of the Skylake architecture, still on 14nm, or at best, 10nm? In isolation it's already a tough sell, but facing more power efficient, performant and featured CPU/APUs from AMD then one can only hope this is a Intel sponsored "round-up" since otherwise it would imply a complete loss of credibility from TH.
    I'm typing this from a Dell XPS 15 2019 edition with i7 9750H, while my personal new laptop is a 4800U Asus TUF.

    It's not even funny. The XPS 15 has a fantastic wide gamut screen, and performance is atrocious. Sure the boost is amazing on paper for the few seconds it can run until thermal limits are hit and the machine throttles down. After 1 year, the keyboard actually bent slightly near the trackpad with the heat and the battery inflated. A replacement was needed. It wasn't an isolated case either - a cursory search for such will reveal lots of angry Dell customers. Luckily the company contract covers it.
    Intel just cannot compete, period. The 4800U performance, battery life, expandability, 2x NVME SSDs, 1x SATA SSD or HDD. Sure the screen gamut won't even cover 100% sRGB, but for that you can find better units from Lenovo, and the Asus G14 with the 4900U, just to name a few.
    The offers displayed in the article are great if you can get them at 30-50% of their sale price.
    In technical merit alone, well, it'll clearly take a bit of time for Intel to catch up. Let's hope they do though, lest AMD "pull an Intel", stop innovating and start charging an arm and a leg for Ryzen rehashes for 5 years.
    Reply
  • Deicidium369
    mariusmotea said:
    I avoid HP and HPE hardware as much as possible after very bad experience with lot of them. Only the laser printers and the L3 switches are quality products.
    Good practice - For laptops, for the last 4 or 5 years it's been nothing but Dell.
    Reply
  • Deicidium369
    brakteat said:
    Indeed. Four years ago when I bought my current laptop, I would not consider buying one with a CPU from AMD because Intel had so much better performance per watt. Now the opposite is true.

    This article actually highlights a true embarrassment for Dell, HP and Apple. They have known since long that AMD would offer Zen2-based mobile CPU with an expected much superior performance compared to Intel. Still all three missed the train by launching new high-end models with only Intel CPU.
    AMD is not seen as a premium brand.

    Intel - Premium, Ultrabook, High End
    AMD - Another Marketing Deception - basement level, last years models, bargain bin
    Reply
  • Deicidium369
    mitch074 said:
    ...and not a single Renoir based machine.
    Renoir is not in a single ultrabook or a single premium laptop.
    Reply
  • mitch074
    Deicidium369 said:
    Renoir is not in a single ultrabook or a single premium laptop.
    Which is... Interesting, because that means that current entry level laptops kick the pants off premium laptops when it comes to CPU power and battery efficiency.
    Wonder why such performance isn't found neither on premium laptops nor ultrabooks. Premium means lousy now ?
    Reply
  • jeremyj_83
    Deicidium369 said:
    AMD is not seen as a premium brand.

    Intel - Premium, Ultrabook, High End
    AMD - Another Marketing Deception - basement level, last years models, bargain bin
    That is such utter BS it is sad to see such statements on Tomshardware forums. Those type of false and rabid fanboyism should be saved for places like wfctech.

    It is quite sad that for their consumer products HP, Dell, etc... not putting AMD CPUs in their top of the line designs. However, for us consumers we end up getting superior performance for less cost, see the $649 Acer Swift 3. The biggest issue with that laptop is the screen isn't the best and it could use a better thermal solution, however, you get better CPU & iGPU performance than the i7-1065G7.
    Reply