Worldwide Reports Suggest Relatively Weak RTX 4080 Sales

RTX 4080 stocks are building
(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Multiple sources worldwide suggest that GeForce RTX 4080 graphics cards aren't selling as well as Nvidia may have hoped. We've checked reports and listings in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, and China, and in all these major markets RTX 4080 GPU sales are, looking for a polite word, sluggish.

Many of the reports don't hold back their criticism of Nvidia's RTX 4080 sales performance, branding it dire or abysmal. Others choose to highlight the biggest issue with this graphics card, that the price is simply too high compared to previous GeForce xx80 model(s). The 71% increase in generational pricing comes as many people in the developed world are in the grip of a cost of living crisis.

Starting with the US, there are a number of interesting posts on the old HardOCP forums about RTX 4080 retail stocks. The clearest indicators of a lack of interest we can see, with regard to the second rung Ada Lovelace graphics card, come from updates on Microcenter stock levels around the country.

Microcenter stock levels (Image credit: HardOCP Forums)

For example, it was noted that Microcenter's RTX 4080 stocks had swollen shortly after launch, and the latest figures show there are still 1,227 units available via this retailer. These are pretty bad retail numbers for a freshly launched Nvidia GPU and only the second Ada Lovelace consumer graphics card to be released.

Online sources like Newegg's RTX 4080 listings (opens in new tab) and Amazon's RTX 4080 cards (opens in new tab) meanwhile mostly consist of third-party resellers at higher prices. That's expected, as demand for online purchases is generally higher than any single brick and mortar store. But it's worth noting that even online, 4080 prices start at 18% over Nvidia's MSRP, where the 4090 starts at more than 40% above MSRP.

In Canada, Hardware Canucks noticed a similar situation with regard to high stock levels. In a Tweet, the Canadian tech site frames the unenthusiastic reception for the RTX 4080 as a parallel to AMD's Radeon RX 6500 XT launch. AMD's little GPU was remarkable for being in stock everywhere after launch, despite the GPU crypto-mining phenomena still running wild.

Multiple retailers in the UK have been grilled by OC3D regarding RTX 4080 stock levels. Only the Nvidia branded RTX 4080 Founders Edition appears to be in short supply in the UK at the time of writing. A mismatch between performance and pricing is blamed for the poor sales numbers by the UK source. It reckons that an RTX 4080 price cut decision is at the "when not if" phase.

In Germany, we see similar reports with regard to sales of the RTX 4080. Hardware Luxxe editor Andreas Schilling says that the sales units through the site's community are "pretty darn low." He also hints that bountiful stock of the GTX 16 / RTX 30 series graphics cards (approx 7,500 units in Germany) means gamers and enthusiasts aren't desperate for an RTX 40 upgrade at this time.

RTX 4080 stocks are building

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

PC Games Hardware in Germany noted that, after a bright first few days for retailers (fast sales and elevated prices), things have slipped back. All major German retailers now have stocks of the RTX 4080, and the used market is looking vibrant (scalpers?).

Today, PCGH.de provided an interesting update in the form of an RTX 4080 survey. Fewer than 1% of the (500+) respondents thought the RTX 4080 was priced fairly, with the most popular survey option suggesting it was overpriced by €500. In other words, respondents want a true RTX 3080 replacement, at the same price.

Chinese customers appear to be equally uninspired by the GeForce RTX 4080. Hong Kong's HKEPC reports that after the fast pace of sales of the RTX 4090, retailers were keen to stock up on the RTX 4080, but the crowds didn't materialize. It reasons that buyers with a big budget are going to collect a relatively small amount of extra cash and buy an RTX 4090 instead, going after the halo product.

Conclusion

Remember, the first days and weeks after the release of any highly anticipated graphics card should be when demand is at its highest point. Moreover, we are well into the traditional pre-holiday buying season with Black Friday sales already underway at many outlets. Reports of sluggish sales at a time like this are all the more damning for Nvidia's pricing decision, with the RTX 4080 ($1,199) launching for several hundred dollars more than the RTX 3080 ($699).

Mark Tyson
Freelance News Writer

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • emike09
    Hope it comes back to bite them. This is the worst pricing I've ever seen in a next-gen lineup. The 4090 is almost worth its price, but the 4080, with dramatically worse performance, is not worth anywhere near $1200+. When Jensen said pricing was going to go up, and stay up, I was expecting 10% or so. Not 70%. The 4080 should have been listed starting at $799.
    Reply
  • husker
    The folks at EVGA are looking like geniuses right about now.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    Good. Nvidia's ridiculous price increase deserves to be rejected. PC gaming shouldn't be limited to people with lots of cash to throw around. A price correction has been needed to make PC gaming more accessible. Hopefully this trend of 4080 rejection continues and pushes down the price of other GPUs.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    bigdragon said:
    Good. Nvidia's ridiculous price increase deserves to be rejected. PC gaming shouldn't be limited to people with lots of cash to throw around. A price correction has been needed to make PC gaming more accessible. Hopefully this trend of 4080 rejection continues and pushes down the price of other GPUs.
    I agree that the prices are high but what makes someone NEED to upgrade from previous generations? Or, why does someone need a top tier card?
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    drivinfast247 said:
    I agree that the prices are high but what makes someone NEED to upgrade from previous generations? Or, why does someone need a top tier card?
    I was motivated to upgrade because of content creation. I needed more performance to support greater levels of 3D subdivision and more complex game engine editor worlds. A lot of other people are pushed to upgrade by VR, buying higher-resolution or refresh rate monitors, or wanting more visual eye candy in their games. For some people, Half Life Alyx and the Valve Index were Crysis-like motivations to upgrade. Otherwise, there's been a lack of games that actually require something newer than a 9 or 10-series GPU.

    I don't know that there's anything to support a 40-series upgrade right now. The price to performance ratio isn't worth it. Nvidia is probably happy that the 4080 isn't selling given that the 30-series cards have somehow increased in pricing recently based on other news posted on Tom's. The 4080 isn't cannibalizing 30-series sales right now. We can all sneer at Nvidia for their pricing and inventory, but I they likely planned for the 4080 to sit while 30-series gets cleaned out.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    PC Games Hardware in Germany noted that, after a bright first few days for retailers (fast sales and elevated prices), things have slipped back.
    The cards selling at high prices the first few days was likely the result of resellers picking them up hoping to make a quick buck if they happened to end up in short supply. But once it became clear that relatively few people were willing to buy the cards at their inflated MSRPs, let alone anything higher, any smart reseller would have quit buying them to avoid potentially having to sell the cards at a loss to get rid of them. Even at MSRP, the 4080 offers worse performance-per-dollar than the launch pricing for the prior generation x80 card released over two years ago.

    I wouldn't be all that surprised if the 4080 saw a price cut relatively soon, or maybe a new version with less VRAM or something at a much lower price. Perhaps we will see a 4080 Ti launch at the current card's price point with performance just behind the 4090, with the 4080 dropping down to a somewhat less excessive price level, maybe around where the cancelled "4080" 12GB was intended to be positioned.
    Reply
  • PiranhaTech
    I can't tell if I'm surprised or not. I thought they might be able to get away with it, but I agree with the sentiment that it's expensive. The escalated Covid prices especially might have made people wary about buying tech gear the moment it comes out.

    I have the feeling that Nvidia and AMD might be taking advantage of the whales that can afford to pay extra, and then price drop over a year or two. I have the feeling that people that are possibly willing to pay $1000 are probably waiting for AMD in December, even if a good amount of them favor Nvidia.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    emike09 said:
    Hope it comes back to bite them. This is the worst pricing I've ever seen in a next-gen lineup. The 4090 is almost worth its price, but the 4080, with dramatically worse performance, is not worth anywhere near $1200+. When Jensen said pricing was going to go up, and stay up, I was expecting 10% or so. Not 70%. The 4080 should have been listed starting at $799.
    Even $799 is too much for a card that is clearly built like a X070 series card.
    Remember when the GTX 1080 Ti was a big ask when it launched at $699 during a mining boom?
    Within 3 iterations, the 4080 is launching at over TWICE the $549 msrp of the GTX 1080, which is a card that is frankly still significantly better than what your average gamer is using right now.
    Reply