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Best X570 Motherboards: ATX, Micro ATX and Mini ITX Tested

AMD Motherboard
(Image credit: AMD)

The best X570 motherboard is of course going to bring the chipset’s primary features, like PCIe 4.0 support (which doubles the bandwidth over previous-gen PCIe 3.0), more and faster USB ports, along with a higher power draw than previous-generation X470 boards. 

The latter means almost all the best X570 motherboards will have built-in fans to cool the chipset. Fear not, though. After some initial worries about fan noise on early boards, companies have tweaked their BIOS settings. At this point, you won’t likely notice the noise of these small fans over other components in your case.

Higher prices are the real sticking point with X570 boards, although Intel’s latest Z490 flagship boards are also pricier than their predecessors, and initial indications are that Intel Z590 motherboards will be expensive as well. If you don’t need lots of speedy lanes for multi-GPU setups or multiple high-end SSDs, you may want to consider one of the best B550 motherboards instead. 

And if you don’t plan on adding a super-speedy SSD or a high-end next-gen graphics card, in most cases you can certainly get by with an older X470 motherboard. But as AM4 CPUs have accumulated, we’ve seen more and more compatibility issues between CPU and motherboard generations. So be sure to check CPU compatibility closely with whatever board you’re considering before buying.

We noted in our AMD X570 vs. Intel Z390 Chipset battle that the sweet spot for memory performance on X570 is DDR 3600, so you’ll also want to pair one of these boards with some of the best RAM you can buy. And with PCIe 4 support, the best SSD for X570 is undoubtedly a PCIe 4.0 drive. But for gaming and many other common tasks, you won’t likely notice the speed difference between a faster drive and a good PCIe 3.0 NVMe model.

For more on the X570 chipset, see our X570 explainer from back when the chipset launched in 2019. And for more general tips about what to look for when buying a motherboard, check out our motherboard buying guide, as well as the eight motherboard features you probably don’t need

The Best X570 Motherboards of 2021

Best X570 Motherboard (if Price Is No Object): Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero  (Image credit: Asus)

1. Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero

Best X570 Motherboard (if Price Is No Object)

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ATX | Voltage Regulator: 16 phases | PCIe x16: (2) v4.0 (x16/x0/x4, x8/x8/x4) | USB Ports: 5 Gbps: (4) Type-A ; 10 Gbps: (7) Type A, (1) Type-C | Warranty: 3 years

16-Phase, 90A Power Delivery
12 USB ports
Eight SATA ports
No chipset fan
No USB 3.2 Gen2x2 (20 Gbps) ports
Only two M.2 sockets
Expensive

At $400, this isn’t a cheap motherboard and does fetch a slight premium over the non-dark Hero. But the jump from 60A to 90A MOSFETs justifies that change, especially for the overclocker. That said, it’s cheaper than the other flagship boards, including the Gigabyte X570 Aorus Extreme ($699.99) or the MSI MEG X570 Godlike ($699.99). And it’s much cheaper than our previous pick in this space, the limited-edition $1,000 ASRock X570 Aqua. All of these boards sport incredibly robust power delivery, multiple M.2 sockets, 2.5 GbE LAN or greater, and many other similar features. In the end, the Asus board is the least expensive flagship in the X570 family. But there are other boards down the competitors stack that compete better on price.

This board looks good, performs well and has almost every feature a user would need. I would like to have seen a USB 3.2 Gen2x2 Type-C port instead of the single Gen2 bandwidth. But outside of that, there isn’t much to complain about that isn’t subjective. The Dark Hero’s performance was spot on, while its overclocking capability is there for both ambient and extreme cooling. In the end, there’s not much we don’t like about this board. If a $400 X570 based motherboard is on your shopping list, the Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero should be on the shortlist.

Read: Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero review

Best High-End X570 Motherboard: Asus X570 ROG Crosshair VIII Hero Wi-Fi (Image credit: Asus)

2. Asus X570 ROG Crosshair VIII Hero Wi-Fi

Best High-End X570 Motherboard

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ATX | Voltage Regulator: 12+2 phases | PCIe x16: (3) v3.0 | USB Ports: USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10 Gbps): 7x Type-A, 1x Type-C USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5 Gbps): 4x Type-A | Warranty: 3 years

Onboard power/reset buttons
Q-code LED display
All M.2 slots include a heatsink
12 USB ports on the rear IO
Expensive
Chipset fan sits directly under the GPU

Packed with 12 USB ports (eight of which are USB 3.2 Gen 2 speeds), a 2.5G LAN port, eight SATA ports, and integrated Wi-Fi 6, he Asus ROG Crosshair VIII Hero Wi-Fi is a good base for a high-end build.

Read: Asus X570 ROG Crosshair VIII Hero Wi-Fi review

Best Mid-Priced X570 Motherboard: Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra (Image credit: Gigabyte)

3. Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra

Best Mid-Priced X570 Motherboard

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ATX | Voltage Regulator: 12+2 phases | PCIe x16: (3) v4.0 | USB Ports: 10 Gbps: 2x Type-A, 1x Type-C, USB 3.2 Gen 1; 5 Gbps: 3x Type-A, USB 2.0: 4x Type-A | Warranty: 3 years

Three high speed M.2 slots, all w/heatsinks
Debug LEDs
Front and Rear USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C port/header
On/off button is a small PCB that plugs into USB header

The Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra focuses on doing basic things very well, such as its twelve 40A core voltage MOSFETs and triple PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 storage slots. With nothing more than a 2.4Gb/s Wi-Fi 6 module to add to its basic Gigabit Ethernet, the paucity of premium add-in features helps Gigabyte to maintain a sub $300 price despite the cost of PCIe 4.0 compliance.

Read: Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra review

Best Mid-Priced X570 Motherboard Alternative: ASRock X570 Steel Legend WiFi ax (Image credit: ASRock)

5. ASRock X570 Steel Legend WiFi ax

Best Mid-Priced X570 Motherboard Alternative

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ATX | Voltage Regulator: 10 phases | PCIe x16: (2) v4.0 (x16/x4) | USB Ports: 10Gbps: (1) Type-C, (1) Type A, 5Gb/s: (6) Type A | Warranty: 3 years

Mid-sized voltage regulator on a value-priced board
Good overall performance
Excellent efficiency
Fixed x16/x4 pathways on the two long PCIe slots
One-piece M.2/PCH cover

Though it’s not ideal for some of the fancier graphics and storage options of the high-end market, the X570 Steel Legend offers Ryzen 3000 buyers great stability and efficiency at a reasonable price. The primary added features it delivers beyond what’s offered by the X570 chipset are the 2.4Gb/s Wi-Fi controller, some onboard lighting, and some extra RGB headers. The rest of this $200 board includes solid basics such as its 10x50A CPU voltage regulator. And if you don’t want to pay for the WiFi, ASRock offers an otherwise-identical X570 Steel Legend without that controller for $10 less.

The primary sacrifice compared to pricier boards is that the second x16-length slot has only four lanes, because the top x16 slot can’t share its lanes. Both viewpoints describe a basic design that eliminates a few pathway switches to save money: Anyone who didn’t need those pathways to be flexible will surely be fine with this. And keep in mind that these are PCIe 4.0 lanes, so even at x4, there’s still quite a bit of bandwidth available to that second slot.

The lesser sacrifice of this board’s design is that its two M.2 covers are built as a single unit that’s integrated with the PCH fan shroud. This means if you want to have a fan shroud, you won’t be able to install any M.2 SSD that has a heat spreader of its own. Uncovering a single M.2 slot while leaving the over covered is likewise not an option.

Read: ASRock X570 Steel Legend WiFi ax review 

Best Budget X570 ATX Motherboard: MSI MPG X570 Gaming Plus (Image credit: MSI)

6. MSI MPG X570 Gaming Plus

Best Budget X570 ATX Motherboard

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ATX | Voltage Regulator: 10 phases | PCIe x16: (2) v4.0 | USB Ports: 10Gbps: (1) Type-C, (1) Type A, 5Gb/s: (4) Type A,(2) USB2.0 | Warranty: 3 years

Adequate voltage regulator for Ryzen 3000 range
Good overclocking on mid-budget Ryzen 7 3700X
Some software and BIOS features didn’t work for us

The MPG X570 Gaming Plus is unmistakably cheap, yet it's eight 46A core voltage regulators still provide enough CPU power to cover the full range of AMD's recent AM4 processors. Fixed PCIe pathways follow a simplified rout to eliminate the need for costly re-drivers, and the board has only one pathway switch that enables its second x1 slot by disabling the first. Its included software couldn't even monitor our hardware, and the firmware menu that's supposed to display connected devices disabled our keyboard and mouse, but buyers who are satisfied by mere adequacy should be pleased by its exceptionally low price.

Read: MSI MPG X570 Gaming Plus review

Best Mini ITX X570 Motherboard: Gigabyte X570-I Aorus Pro Wi-Fi (Image credit: Gigabyte)

7. Gigabyte X570-I Aorus Pro Wi-Fi

Best Mini ITX X570 Motherboard

Socket: AM4 | Chipset: AMD X570 | Form Factor: ITX | Voltage Regulator: 6+2 phases | PCIe x16: (1) v4.0 | USB Ports: USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10 Gbps): 1x Type-A (red) USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps): 4x Type-A | Warranty: 3 years

Low price for the feature set
USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-C port on rear IO
Two M.2 slots
Q-Flash Plus for easy BIOS updates
3-plug audio stack
Only two fan headers

The Gigabyte X570-I Aorus Pro WiFi performed well at stock and when overclocking. Dual M.2 slots on the ITX form factor is its claim to fame, and it also includes two USB3 Gen 2 ports (one Type-C, the other Type-A) and four USB3 Gen1 ports on the rear IO. This tiny board offers users a great assortment of features and is a well-rounded solution for its small form factor, and comes at moderate price that undercuts the competition.

Read: Gigabyte X570-I Aorus Pro Wi-Fi review

  • dalauder
    It seems odd to go with the Gigabyte Aorus over the MSI Tomahawk. As far as I know, the Tomahawk keeps it's chipset MUCH cooler, on par with the high end boards.
    Reply
  • MASOUTH
    The Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra pricing links are for the incorrect product and prices. All 3 links go to Gigabyte X570 Pro WiFi (1 for the mini ITX, 1 to the ATX, and Best buy who shows the ITX but specifies the ATX) listings which tend to be $40-$70 cheaper than the Ultra board (or in Best Buy's case, they don't even carry the Ultra). The previous Best X570 motherboards story had the exact same issue but I thought it might get sorted out with next update. I guess not...
    Reply
  • cgigoux
    Just a minor nit to pick. If you're going to have "Best ... Micro ATX ..." in the title, you might want to actually include a Micro ATX motherboard in the list. I realize that there's basically only one contender (AS Rock Pro4M) that you've not tested and its VRM section isn't up to snuff compared to just about everyone else, so you might just want to edit the title a tad.

    Cheers.
    Reply
  • godparticle
    I bought the gigabyte x570 i aorus pro wifi partially on the recommendation here. I'm having a bluetooth issue which it seems many on reddit are experiencing as well. I also don't like that the NVME slot is directly above the heatsink. Even worse is that gigabyte includes a heatsync/fan for the chipset which means if you purchase an NVME drive with a heatsync you will have to remove it. I'm sending it back and getting a different board. Just thought I would post this to hopefully save someone else the pain of an RMA.
    Reply
  • Xereoth
    godparticle said:
    I bought the gigabyte x570 i aorus pro wifi partially on the recommendation here. I'm having a bluetooth issue which it seems many on reddit are experiencing as well. I also don't like that the NVME slot is directly above the heatsink. Even worse is that gigabyte includes a heatsync/fan for the chipset which means if you purchase an NVME drive with a heatsync you will have to remove it. I'm sending it back and getting a different board. Just thought I would post this to hopefully save someone else the pain of an RMA.
    Doesn't the mobo have 2 heatsinks for the NVME, and thus couldn't you get the NVME drive without heatsink?

    Or am I misunderstanding or missing something?
    Reply
  • godparticle
    Xereoth said:
    Doesn't the mobo have 2 heatsinks for the NVME, and thus couldn't you get the NVME drive without heatsink?

    Or am I misunderstanding or missing something?
    It has a chipset fan and some thermal tape that you put on your SSD to conduct the heat. I was hoping I could get away with just using the built in heatsink on my ssd but then the chipset got too hot without the little fan connected. If you're willing to deal with it I'm sure you could make it work but I wasn't impressed.
    Reply
  • Xereoth
    godparticle said:
    It has a chipset fan and some thermal tape that you put on your SSD to conduct the heat. I was hoping I could get away with just using the built in heatsink on my ssd but then the chipset got too hot without the little fan connected. If you're willing to deal with it I'm sure you could make it work but I wasn't impressed.
    Hmm that does sound sucky. Was planning on building a new PC for the second time ever, after using my first build for way too long.
    Waiting on the Zen 3 to release and was looking into a fitting mobo around 250euro's.
    The aorus x570 pro seemed like a nice one but after reading your comment I'm doubting about it and possible other things I might have overlooked.

    thanks for responding though.
    Reply
  • godparticle
    Xereoth said:
    Hmm that does sound sucky. Was planning on building a new PC for the second time ever, after using my first build for way too long.
    Waiting on the Zen 3 to release and was looking into a fitting mobo around 250euro's.
    The aorus x570 pro seemed like a nice one but after reading your comment I'm doubting about it and possible other things I might have overlooked.

    thanks for responding though.
    My pleasure! I'm always thrilled when my warning posts get a hit. Makes me feel like there was some purpose to me pulling my hair out in frustration. I hope you fare better than I did no matter what you choose to do. That bluetooth issue was annoying. (devices kept dropping every 30 seconds or so). Honestly the bluetooth was a bigger deal than the chipset. I probably could have lived with the noisy little fan but I'm a gamer so I want bluetooth controllers and headsets to be rock solid.
    Reply
  • Xereoth
    godparticle said:
    My pleasure! I'm always thrilled when my warning posts get a hit. Makes me feel like there was some purpose to me pulling my hair out in frustration. I hope you fare better than I did no matter what you choose to do. That Bluetooth issue was annoying. (devices kept dropping every 30 seconds or so). Honestly the Bluetooth was a bigger deal than the chipset. I probably could have lived with the noisy little fan but I'm a gamer so I want Bluetooth controllers and headsets to be rock solid.
    Yeah, your hair loss was not in vain haha. I don't use Bluetooth and my headphone has a separate receiver so that should be fine. I'm just worried about the chipset fan but after some more research I've concluded that the chipset fan can be turned off in idle. So it will only run while gaming. At which point my GPU and CPU fans will be running also and they should be louder than the chipset fan. And the mobo has two onboard heatsinks for the m.2 slots which should suffice (i'm new to those SSD's so still have no clue) and the 970 evo's don't really need a heatsink anyway they say. So I don't think I'll need a a separate heatsink on top of the m.2 (again, unless i'm misunderstanding something)

    Thanks for your time and explanation!
    Reply