Six 2.5” High-Capacity Notebook Hard Drives

Hitachi Travelstar 5K750 HTS547575A9E384 (750 GB)

Hitachi addresses a broad range of applications with its 2.5“ Travelstar 5K750 product line, including mobile computing and mobile storage, game consoles, blade servers, network routers, and video surveillance systems. There are three models available: 500 GB, 640 GB, and 750 GB. We’re testing the flagship model, the 750 GB HTS547575A9E384, which costs about $80.

The Travelstar 5K750 hard disk has two platters with 375 GB each and features a storage density of 472 Gb per square inch. All models in this product range employ AF and emulate 512-byte sectors. The disks are 9.5 mm (0.374“) high, have an 8 MB cache, rotate at 5400 RPM, and feature a SATA 3Gb/s interface, which is still sufficient for notebook hard disks.

All Travelstar 5K750 models can optionally be ordered with BDE (Bulk Data Encryption) support, which includes a hardware encryption unit, or as the Enhanced Availability (EA) version, certified for 24/7 operation. Unfortunately, as with base and BDE-equipped drive, Hitachi does not specify the EA SKU’s MTBF. The model numbers of the BDE variants end in 1 instead of 4; the model number of the EA variants begin with HTE instead of HTS.

Performance

According to its specification sheet, the maximum data rate of the Travelstar 5K750 is 998 Mb/s. Average access time is quoted as 12 ms, which is a tad optimistic, according to our tests. We measured access times between 18 and 20 ms, with the 750 GB model clocking in at the high end of this range. Hitachi specifies 1.5 W power consumption while active and 0.8 watts while idle. Our tests confirm the idle value, but the power consumption of an active disk varies between 1.2 W and 2.4 W, depending on the benchmark.

With a 73.7 MB/s average sequential read speed and 73.1 MB/s average sequential writes, the Hitachi Travelstar 5K750 places last in the data rate tests. Most of the other competitors with a 5400 RPM spindle speed are significantly faster. Only Samsung’s Spinpoint M8 HN-M500MBB is in the same speed category. Hitachi’s sample is outclassed by the Spinpoint M8 HN-M101MBB and, even more so, the Western Digital Scorpio Blue WD10JPVT.

Create a new thread in the US Reviews comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
25 comments
Comment from the forums
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • Zero_
    Talk about a bad time for a hard drive comparison...
    10
  • Other Comments
  • arpitnathany
    On the western digital hard disk page the Western Digital Scorpio Black WD7500BPKT is mentioned as 750 TB please correct it.

    Nice article as a whole
    0
  • arpitnathany
    On a lighter note I would love to have a 750 TB drive at that price
    someday.....
    2
  • acyuta
    Good to have all the latest data in one place. Wish Dell had put in the 750GB Scorpio Black instead of 750GB Momentus in my XPS15.

    One minor point: good to know that i7-920 is now part of Sandybridge. Can you check???
    0
  • JeTJL
    Wonder how well these things survive the drop test. If they can survive a fall that a SSD can sustain then I'll be up for it. Other than that wish higher capacity SSDs become cheaper.
    -8
  • Zero_
    Talk about a bad time for a hard drive comparison...
    10
  • howardp6
    GoFlex is a Seagate disk product line not Western Digital
    2
  • AppleBlowsDonkeyBalls
    Western Digital hard drives sound good in theory for laptops, but they're not. I would never use one unless they fix a fatal flaw.

    What flaw? The fact that the hard drive automatically goes to sleep (parks its head) after eight seconds of inactivity, and since this is hardwired into the firmware it completely dismisses what you set in your Power Options in the Windows 7 Control Panel. Why is this bad? Because if the HDD is inactive for more than eight seconds it needs to unpark its head, and that creates a very noticeable lag when launching applications or working with files because the process takes a few seconds to complete, not to mention it puts more stress on the HDD mechanics.

    Unless it's simply for a storage drive where you don't care about performance I recommend you go with Seagate, Hitachi, or Samsung for laptop HDDs instead.
    2
  • cadder
    Current prices are a bit higher than what is mentioned in the article, actually pretty scary:

    Hitachi 750GB $140-160
    Samsung 1TB $220
    WD 750GB $160
    WD 1TB $230
    4
  • ewood
    yeah prices are way off
    0
  • youssef 2010
    I'd go with the WD Scorpio Black
    0
  • youssef 2010
    cadderCurrent prices are a bit higher than what is mentioned in the article, actually pretty scary:Hitachi 750GB $140-160Samsung 1TB $220WD 750GB $160WD 1TB $230


    That's because of the incident at WD's factory
    0
  • 11796pcs
    youssef 2010That's because of the incident at WD's factory

    I was looking at Newegg and a 500GB Caviar Black that I had bought a year ago for $50-$60 was $150.
    0
  • egmccann
    cadderCurrent prices are a bit higher than what is mentioned in the article, actually pretty scary:Hitachi 750GB $140-160Samsung 1TB $220WD 750GB $160WD 1TB $230


    Yeah. Hard drive prices would have made for a great halloween article - they'd frighten all system builders and anyone looking for a storage upgrade. And we'll supposedly be seeing them like that for a while yet.
    0
  • crisan_tiberiu
    BTW, whats with the high prices on HDDs nowdays? i heard that the prices rised because some floding in some country?
    0
  • egmccann
    crisan_tiberiuBTW, whats with the high prices on HDDs nowdays? i heard that the prices rised because some floding in some country?

    Flooding in Thailand, yep.

    From toms (link up above the discussion)
    Quote:
    The hard drive market is reacting to the heavy floods in Thailand.


    Zoom
    Prices for hard drives have jumped by as much as 50 percent within one week, market research firm IHS said. About a quarter of all hard drives are manufactured in Thailand and it appears that all major vendors are affected in some way.

    Western Digital previously said that it may see a revenue decline of about 60 percent in the current quarter and told German publication Golem.de that it will be able to produce only 22 to 26 million drives this quarter, instead of the planned 58 million units. A spokesperson said that WD "currently waits for the factories to dry" to be able to restart its manufacturing tools. What makes matters worse are the usually thin profit margins in the HDD industry, which means that manufacturers typically have only five to seven days of material supply.

    A Seagate manager told CRN India that the company expects and "acute" shortage of drives and that the manufacturer expects prices to increase. However, there was no information how sharp this increase can be. Both WD and Seagate said that the floods in Thailand have created a problem for the industry that will take several quarters to resolve.


    Other sources:

    CRN
    PC World
    0
  • nebun
    arpitnathanyOn the western digital hard disk page the Western Digital Scorpio Black WD7500BPKT is mentioned as 750 TB please correct it.Nice article as a whole

    750 TB? i did not know that they made such large hard drives...maybe you mean 750GB :)
    0
  • nebun
    acyutaGood to have all the latest data in one place. Wish Dell had put in the 750GB Scorpio Black instead of 750GB Momentus in my XPS15. One minor point: good to know that i7-920 is now part of Sandybridge. Can you check???

    you can always replace it yourself, lol....it's not that expensive, lol
    0
  • danwat1234
    About the Scorpio Black 750GB drive and it's power consumption. I put one in my friend's Asus 1005HA netbook and it doesn't get very warm and cut the boot time in half versus the stock one platter 160GB 5400RPM drive.
    The heat/power consumption isn't an issue.
    0
  • danwat1234
    AppleBlowsDonkeyBallsWestern Digital hard drives sound good in theory for laptops, but they're not. I would never use one unless they fix a fatal flaw.What flaw? The fact that the hard drive automatically goes to sleep (parks its head) after eight seconds of inactivity, and since this is hardwired into the firmware it completely dismisses what you set in your Power Options in the Windows 7 Control Panel. Why is this bad? Because if the HDD is inactive for more than eight seconds it needs to unpark its head, and that creates a very noticeable lag when launching applications or working with files because the process takes a few seconds to complete, not to mention it puts more stress on the HDD mechanics.Unless it's simply for a storage drive where you don't care about performance I recommend you go with Seagate, Hitachi, or Samsung for laptop HDDs instead.


    Hmm, my WD Scorpio Black 750GB park it's heads about once a minute. I can hear it lock. But I have never experienced any lag from it and so far it hasn't worn out. My load cycle count is a 50,000 so far no problems with 2696 of power on hours.
    0
  • danwat1234
    Err, about every 3 minutes.
    0